Hello to our Guest
Welcome to the Mid-America Bigfoot Research Center Forums!
It is currently Mon Oct 15, 2018 10:32 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Forum rules


Behave like adults



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Vitamin C hypothesis
PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2011 2:51 pm 
Online
Chief Forum Administrator/MABRC Executive Director
Chief Forum Administrator/MABRC Executive Director
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 12:52 pm
Posts: 16001
Images: 0
Medals: 39
The reported food preferences of the sasquatch include citrus, evergreen branch tips, apples, and berries. All of these foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin C. This leads to the hypothesis that the sasquatch, like Homo sapiens, requires Vitamin C for good nutrition. Lack of Vitamin C in humans leads to scurvy.

This hypothesis is so far untested as it would require the impractical measure of isolating a sasquatch from Vitamin C sources and observing the health consequences. Nonetheless, if true, it leads to the interesting and useful conclusion that baiting of the sasquatch should include Vitamin C content. Should such baiting be undertaken the food preferences of the sasquatch could perhaps be observed.

Observations of Baiting Stations
[None so far. This subheading is included for future observations of anyone who wants to include experimental data.]

DNA analysis of the Sasquatch relevant to the Vitamin C hypothesis
[None so far reported. This subheading is included for future analysis of DNA.]






Top
 Profile Personal album  
 
 Post subject: Re: Vitamin C hypothesis
PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2011 7:08 pm 
Offline
MABRC Organizational Member
MABRC Organizational Member

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 1:36 pm
Posts: 897
Location: Central Oklahoma
Medals: 12
I was reading a book called "The Primal Feast" by a nutritionist recently.The Eskimos survived primarily on raw meat ,raw blubber and seaweed for hundreds of years with no problems. There is some vitamin C in raw meat and fat that is destroyed by cooking.This is also another reason that Bigfoot would have no need for fire.The author of "The Primal Feast" believes our hunter gatherer ancestors developed cooking to destroy the toxins in some of the wild starchy wild foods they gathered to make them more palatable.There are toxins found in wild potatoes for instance that were removed by selective breeding from the domesticated spuds we consume today.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Vitamin C hypothesis
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 7:08 pm 
Offline
MABRC Organizational Member
MABRC Organizational Member

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 1:36 pm
Posts: 897
Location: Central Oklahoma
Medals: 12
"Much of what we know about the Eskimo diet comes from the legendary arctic anthropologist and adventurer Vilhjalmur Stefansson, who made several daredevil journeys through the region in the early 20th century. Stefansson noticed the same thing you did, that the traditional Eskimo diet consisted largely of meat and fish, with fruits, vegetables, and other carbohydrates — the usual source of vitamin C — accounting for as little as 2 percent of total calorie intake. Yet they didn't get scurvy.

Stefansson argued that the native peoples of the arctic got their vitamin C from meat that was raw or minimally cooked — cooking, it seems, destroys the vitamin. (In fact, for a long time "Eskimo" was thought to be a derisive Native American term meaning "eater of raw flesh," although this is now discounted.) Stefansson claimed the high incidence of scurvy among European explorers could be explained by their refusal to eat like the natives. He proved this to his own satisfaction by subsisting in good health for lengthy periods — one memorable odyssey lasted for five years — strictly on whatever meat and fish he and his companions could catch.

A few holdouts didn't buy it. To settle the matter once and for all, Stefansson and a colleague lived on a meat-only diet for one year under medical supervision at New York's Bellevue Hospital, starting in February 1928. The two ate between 100 and 140 grams of protein a day, the balance of their calories coming from fat, yet they remained scurvy free. Later in life Stefansson became a strong advocate of a high-meat diet even if you didn't live in the arctic; he professed to enjoy improved health, reduced weight, etc, from meals consisting of coffee, the occasional grapefruit, and a nice steak, presumably rare. Doesn't sound half bad, and one might note that until recently the Inuit rarely suffered from atherosclerosis and other Western ailments.

Vitamin C can be found in a variety of traditional Eskimo/Inuit staples, including the skin of beluga whales (known as muktuk), which is said to contain as much vitamin C as oranges. Other reported sources include the organ meats of sea mammals as well as the stomach contents of caribou. You're thinking: It'll be a mighty cold day in the arctic before they catch me eating the stomach contents of caribou. Indeed, you have to wonder whether the Inuit really ate such stuff either, since Stefansson describes it being fed to dogs.

Other aspects of the arctic diet also remain controversial. For example, some say the Eskimos could get vitamin C from blueberries during the summer months, while others say you'd be lucky to find enough berries to cover a bowl of Rice Chex. I say let's not sweat the details of the menu, which varied from region to region anyway. We know Eskimos got enough vitamin C in their traditional diet to survive because obviously they did. Now it's academic — most arctic natives live in villages and get their vitamin C from OJ and Juicy Juice, just like you and I." http://www.straightdope.com/columns/rea ... get-scurvy


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Vitamin C hypothesis
PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2011 10:31 am 
Offline
MABRC Organizational Member
MABRC Organizational Member

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 2:23 pm
Posts: 801
Location: Oklahoma City
Medals: 9
31.30 minutes into this podcast

Dr. Esteban Sarmiento gives very good information on Vitamin C
in regard to Primates/(Sasquatches) vs humans
and other vitamins as well

Such as not all humans will get scurvy..if they don't eat fruit

Only the people from the part of the world that "normally" eat fruit will get scurvy
if it is taken away


http://www.blogtalkradio.com/mnbrt/2010/06/05/mnbrt-radio-with-the-restrn-of-dresteban-sarmiento.mp3

_________________
Hunter
A skeptic until I see one with my own eyes..


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Vitamin C hypothesis
PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2011 11:17 pm 
Offline
MABRC Organizational Member
MABRC Organizational Member

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 1:36 pm
Posts: 897
Location: Central Oklahoma
Medals: 12
Dr. Esteban Sarmiento is essentially agreeing with THE PRIMAL FEAST then.Human cultures worldwide have adapted their diet worldwide to survive in whatever enviroment they reside in.If a culture is unable to do this it dies.Central Americans will tell anthropologists that they add lime to their tortillas because it tastes better.A nutritionist will discover that adding lime to their basic diet of corn and beans is the only way they can ensure they are getting complete proteins in their diet. Oriental cultures use soy sauce for the same reason.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
MABRC Forums © 2011 Mid-America Bigfoot Research Center
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

website metrics

This forum will sometimes contain copyrighted information, however, it is placed here under Title 17

Not withstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.